Chemistry

Difference Between Rate Constant and Specific Rate Constant

The major difference between Rate Constant and Specific Rate Constant is that Rate Constant is a constant of proportionality in the rate Law Equation and is equal to the rate of reaction when the molar concentration of each reactant is unity while the Specific Rate Constant ( Rate of Reaction) is the change in concentration of the reactant or product per unit time.

Difference Between Rate Constant and Specific Rate Constant

Rate Constant

The rate constant (k) is a measure of how quickly an event will happen, or more specifically, how fast a chemical reaction will happen. Say the rate constant for sugar and vinegar reacting to form acetic acid is 1/s. That means that every second molecule of either sugar or vinegar reacts to form two molecules of acetic acid.

When you’re looking at this type of relationship it’s often helpful to learn what the units are for each measurement so that you can get a sense of scale – seconds per molecule aren’t very useful without knowing what “one” looks like! So let’s say we have 1g sugar and 0.5L vinegar in our container.

  1. It is proportionality constant in the rate expression.
  2. It is the ratio between the rate of reaction and the concentration of reactants.

Specific Rate Constant

The Specific Rate Constant is the speed at which a reaction takes place. It’s important for chemists to know how fast reactions happen because it helps them determine what they need to do in order to make that reaction go faster or slower. 

  1. It is the rate of reaction when the molar concentration of each reactant is unity, i.e. 1 mol / dm3.
  2. It is equal to the rate of a reaction.

Related Articles

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

Back to top button